PERIODICALS, JOURNALS, MAGAZINES and NEWSPAPERS

Journal Portal

This site lists all the full text journal subscriptions (print
and electronic) available to Bryant students, faculty and staff and provides direct access to full text electronic titles. Most of these are paid subscriptions and are not freely available on the internet. Use this site to find out if Bryant has access to a particular electronic journal title and then link directly to the content of that title via one of Bryant's information providers such as EBSCO, PROQUEST, etc. In addition, through this portal you can see what electronic journals Bryant has access to by subject.


Electronic
Access to Journals and Newspapers
(Magazines, Periodicals, etc.)

Bryant subscribes to databases such as PROQUEST and EBSCO which index 1,000s of journals.  (All such databases are listed on our Articles & Databases page). Full text and page images are available for most of the titles indexed.  If there is no electronic full text for an article you need, we may have it in print format or it may be available on microfilm. If it is not available on site here at Bryant University we can get it for you from another library or we can tell you where you may get it locally if you are in a hurry. Stop by the Research & Instruction Desk for assistance.  

Some journal articles retrieved from your search will be a summary of the article only - this is called an abstract. Others will be in citation form only - in other words just the information listed in order to locate the article, i.e. journal title, journal date, article title, page. PROQUEST also selectively indexes some full text articles and even some full text with the image. Not all journals are indexed on PROQUEST, or EBSCO however. Use both databases in your research as they both contain different titles as well as some of the same titles. Not all years of a journal's run are available through these services. Check the online publication titles indexes in both of these databases if you are looking for a particular title. It may be merely indexed on one but could be full text in another. If you look up a journal title in the Bryant University Library Catalog, sometimes there is an HTML link to the journal's freely available site on the internet. You may find the current issue here or selective articles from the current issue. There may also be an archive of back file issues. If you are having trouble locating a particular article or need held in finding journal articles - ask a librarian for assistance.

Electronic newspapers such as the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal are available via PROQUEST Image of front page of the New York Times 10/29/1929Newspapers.   Use LEXIS/NEXIS for searching national and international newspapers.   Historical editions of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal are available separately or combined via PROQUEST's historical database. Access the Providence Journal through Newsbank.


Embargoes and Electronic Titles

The most recent issues of some titles are not readily available due to an embargo period specified by the journal publisher. Each journal title can have a different embargo period. Embargo periods can range from 1 week to 5 years. Ask a library staff member for assistance - an interlibrary loan may be required if an article is not readily available via Bryant's collections.

Print Journals and Newspapers

The Douglas and Judith Krupp Library currently subscribes to approximately 100 print journals (i.e. magazines) and newspapers.

Current journal issues and newspapers are filed alphabetically by title  on the shelving in the periodicals area on the main level of the library (to your right as you enter the library). The latest issue received is displayed on the shelf. Prior issues from the past year or two are stored underneath the shelves - simply lift up the shelf.

Back issues (issues older than 1 or two years) of some print journals are stored in the automated compact shelving (BACKFILE) area on the main level. These stacks are for "LIBRARY STAFF ONLY." If you need a journal from this area - go to one of the service desks on the main level.

You can find out the latest issue received of a particular journal title by looking in the Bryant Library Catalog under the title of the journal. By looking in the Bryant Library Catalogyou will be able to see current receipts and the format that the journal is retained in (print, microfilm and occasionally online). If you have any questions or confusion about this, please ask library staff and we will help you locate what you need.

Microfilm (Journals and Newspapers)

Some older issues of journals and newspapers are available on microfilm only. Journals on microfilm are housed in the black cabinets near the "print booth" on the main level. "Newspaper" microfilm is stored in the black cabinets across from the copy machines on the main level. Microfilm is filed alphabetically by title. Please ask library staff for assistance with the microfilm reader stations.

Scholarly Journals, including peer-reviewed

In PROQUEST and EBSCO databases there is an option to search for scholarly and peer reviewed articles only. Below is PROQUEST's definition of scholarly and peer reviewed journals:

"A publication is considered to be scholarly if it is authored by academics for a target audience that is mainly academic, the printed format isn't usually a glossy magazine, and it is published by a recognized society with academic goals and missions.

A publication is considered to be peer reviewed if its articles go through an official editorial process that involves review and approval by the author's peers (people who are experts in the same subject area.) Most (but not all) scholarly publications are peer reviewed. Some trade publications are actually peer reviewed, but PROQUEST does not consider them when filtering on peer reviewed. This is because getting results from trade publications instead of academic journals can be frustrating to researchers. Instead, PROQUEST excludes these peer reviewed trade publications and only considers publications that are scholarly in terms of content, intent, and audience."